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to day livelihood in plays like west virginia, louisiana. while their environment is being destroyed, if you think about louisiana as a state that is being literally destroyed by the industry that employs a good number of the people there. so every mechanism in that state is designed to protect an industry that's destroying the state. but people as real lives are tied to it. even democrats, someone like jay rockefeller who is considered a great prerogative when it comes to coal, he's are with the republicans. >> anyone who is going to be elected -- there are certain places where it's the geographic interests override the ideological ones. >> that's why is we need some actually leadership from the president, and others on the really central issues. i mean, look, climate change is the legacy issue of all legacy issues. you know, 100 years from now, the only thing that people are going to look back on 2012 and care about. the fiscal cliff or the -- it's like, you guys the arctic melts and you didn't do anything about it? why is that? >> keystone is one pipeline. the canadian company is
, as does my environment just by nature. so the book is very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth and how over time it changes. the same substance -- stone, rock, water, wood -- go from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat. and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality all the way from childhood where we're immortal to our elder years where we become the thing that holds so many people we've lost and is what survives. memory is what survives. and within that memory the afterlife of so much. so thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago, i certainly did not expect i would end up here or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think what we've heard so far is that a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never have been an outpost? what's the context within my own war experience? who was i before i went
tax, it forces us to shut down ranches and farms. it's not good for the environment and future generations and americans in general. reporter: he paid the irs $2 million when he inherited the ranch more than two decades ago. at this point, his children will have to pay $13 million. reporter: that will jump to 52 million estates who will be affected by this. farmers say it hurts them because all their money is in the dirt and not in their pocket. jon: the fact he pay taxes on your life and that he pay them again when you die, it's a great system thank you well, we finally seeing some compromise between capitol hill and the white house? details of what takes place at that meeting between the president and congressional leaders. is there some agreement here somewhere? jenna: plus, we are watching the volatile situation between israel and hamas militants. day three of airstrikes. israel is wondering if there is a ground assault on the way. we have answers ahead. [ malannouncer ] it'that time of year again. time for cii price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink cast
environment. >> within the family, what were some of the dynamics? >> my father was, he was mexican-american. my mother was european-american and so that kind of created a very, sort of a complicated household. they had a lot of children right away in the late 60's, early 70's. i don't know if this was traditional to most, you know, hispanic or american families that my sisters were kind of the property of my mother and my brother and myself for the property of my dad. as boys, working with the father who wants a trucking company, we were sort of like the indentured laborers for him. my sisters were living this almost idyllic lifestyle as princesses. and so, that is kind of the intentions i draw from early on in the book. >> how much your family still alive and what do they think of the book, the boy kings? >> every member of my family is still alive. my grandmother and while the story is tough and gritty, they have actually been supported. my mother and my father haven't really kind of come to terms with it. they find the stories too painful to relive. but they are still very suppo
unwelcome environment. the milk truck will come. raised $15,000 for this. you hear, women forced into bathrooms to nurse. not legal in all 50 states. >> that's crazy. >> in public domain. i should say. >> it is nature the i never understood why people get freaked out by all that stuff. that truck, that truck. >> tata truck. >> wonder if they host bachelor parties. also, take a look. video speaks for itself. a product that started as a joke. actually is a real thing you can been for $40. a swifter you put on your kid, crawl on the floor, they're cleaning up. same team they're crawling. get it for $40. betterthanpants.com. started as a >>> this morning on "world news now" -- we follow the e-mail trail that is at the center of the military sex scandal. >> that is just as we are seeing one of the women involved for the first time since the story broke. it's wednesday, november 14th. >> announcer: from abc news this is "world news now." > >>> good morning, everybody. well paula broadwell was seen just last night in washington through the window of her brother's house. good morning on
environment it would not, but the problem, january 200816 bucks, and january 2012, 41 bucks. i would not pile into it, but i like the risk-reward here. it's a relatively safe place, but the economic backdrop continues to serve them well. they opened a 111 stores in the last quarter alope. cheryl: competition in feasm dollar as well, other retailers. >> family dollar, dollar general, performing better. i have the comparable -- all trading at 14, pe, same book value, everything of the this is the one that's probably oversold, perhaps -- i will tell you this to your point, 35 # as a stop, has room to go to 44, and from there we'll reassess it. dennis: 39 today and up 3% today. all right. cheryl: making money with charles. dennis: tough twinkie talk threatening to liquidate unless the strikers return to be tonig. cheryl: how the currencies fare against the dollar. interesting times now in europe. as you can see, the year -- euro a little bit weaker against the dollar. we'll be right back. cheryl: ceo of chrysler announcing a major plan to add investments at three major plants. one is jeff locke,
. they matter a lot. they create a environment which we can make or not make money. it is tough for investors. there will be volatile days. the trick for investors to have enough liquidity in their portfolio that they don't have to trade on these volatile down days. they're ready to take some opportunities when, when they find some good earnings. tracy: like what? let's say this market falls further. you go in. you start buying. what are you buying? >> i think we're, we're buying companies with a following characterics. we're buying companies that have strong brands. that have technology that is hard to replicate and have access to growing markets. the tough part of being an investor, you find companies like that in a lot of sectors and find them with headquarters in a lot of different countries. you want to look for the characterics of companies, not the kind of thing --. tracy: like what? hospitals for instance? >> i can't name. i'm not here to name names. we know that hospitals are are run very efficiently will ben at this time from obamacare. that is, they're well-positioned for that. we
businesses getting out and selling products. how quickly do you see small-business environment? are they somewhat encouraged? >> we take the business in a different way, felt restricted to be in a brick and mortar situation and now they realize they can take the business mobile and serve customers in a different way than they served in the past. tracy: you can sell your product at the next house party. you are great. thank you. it is on the web site and available december 3rd. up next, liz claman is at the cme global leadership conference, cheryl casone in studio. liz claman will be talking exclusively to the biggest names including the virgin group shall under -- founder and chairman richard branson. he starts billion dollar businesses no matter what uncertainty is going on in the world and cme executive chairman terry duffy blasting the government for hurting his ability to run his business. count down to the closing bell. cheryl casone is here in studio. that is all next. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the gre
. that is a real scoop in an environment where there are no deals, david brought us a very good scoop. >> that's why you haven't participated in any of this. there are no other deals. this was the only one. >> not many needles in the hay stack. >> david found the only one. thank you for bringing it here, david. boyd jeffries name. >> what was it exposure in europe? >> egan had all sorts of rhymes and reasons for that company falling apart. >> we'll talk about shipping right now, from i-phones to apparel, cnbc's senior talent producer, lori ann larocco, our staff, incredible producer and her book "dynasties of the sea," and lori ann, reading through this, we know how important shipping is, we talk about it every day but there were things i didn't realize how much of the things in our homes are brought to us from ships. >> 92% of everything in a household has been on a ship and ever since superstorm sandy we've all realized how important shipping is as we're all going through this gasoline crisis. it's really amazing in terms of the wide breadth that the shipping industry has on the economy. >>
sorts of things. but also along with training them, you have to create an institution and environment were you see guys going to happen and it's not necessarily a career ender when it happened. but we are working on it and i think we've gotten better because it's absolutely essential that we do. briefly in the demographics, one of the things i noticed was about 70% are public diplomacy dollars were spent if you do it demographically on an over the age we flipped out because looking at the world and the way it is, the fact of the matter is you have a far better opportunity employment being a planting seeds of the younger demographic, paul said it is difficult when someone reaches 40, 50, 62 change their perception of their ideas. when they are younger you have an ability to do it. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan, 15 or 16 years old, she will be able to change the perception of the united states and her family and her community and away we never could. so it's a wise estimate, not just for the future, but frankly for right now. >> so with a clash of tech
countries that have more competitive environment and taxes are one of them. yes, we have to reform the tax code. when you do that, i will get more revenue. it is guaranteed. again, sort of as i was talking about earlier. this is opportunities here. this is opportunity for us as a country. if you look at the congressional budget analysis and joint tax committee analysis, what tax reform could mean in terms of macroeconomic impact and growth, all will lead to more growth, whether corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> right but if the president insists as he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and, fought over tax rates, rising tax rates, he didn't ice the words rates himself but jay carney, the white house press secretary said the president will veto any bill that extends the current tax rates. if he insists that tax rates go up for those making over $250,000, what's, what would your recommendation be to the republican congress and senate? >> first having worked in two white houses i believe a president does have a veto over the press secretary. thank goodness b
the environment is bad for the environment, beavers form wetlands other species could move into. he's important. >> what else does he eat besides bananas? >> vegetation and he likes to eat tree bark. he has teeth on them that are so much enamel that are bright orange. these guys chop down trees and build dams with them. >> you don't want to get in front of an angry beaver. >> bring out the owl. >> let me put the baby alligator away. the last animal is another species that would have been -- >> what are they called? >> barn owl. these are a species native to europe. european colonists would have been used to seeing these guys. these animals can find prey in pitch darkness. >> you're kidding. >> tests have been done on these species, they've removed every iota of light. they are called barn owls, because they are one of the few species that can live in human structures and benefit from our building. >> is that okay on your hand, looks like he's breaking skin. >> this is the first time you haven't been pooped on or bleeding. the turkey did enough for everybody. thank you so much, dave. >> thank yo
investment is going to follow countries that have a more competitive environment in taxes is one of them's a we have to reform the tax code and when you do that you will get more revenue. it's guaranteed. again, as i was talking at earlier there are opportunities here for us as a country and if you look at the congressional budget analysts this and go to the tax committee analysis what tax reform could mean in the economic growth and all of them will lead to more growth with this corporate tax reform. estimate of the president says what he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and we fought over rising tax rates. jay carney said they would veto any bill that extends the current tax rate so if he insists that tax rates go out for those making over to under $50,000 will would your recommendation before the conference in the senate? >> working in to white house is i believe a president does have a veto because i like the president's comments better than jay carney's comments. i think jay carney mabey was a little behind the curve on that because look, it makes no sense to ta
genes protect you in the environment. >> ways to survive the holiday season. fight for sleep and stay one-handed. >> have one hand free to shake hands so get to drink with the other hand or eat with the other but no two-fisted eating or drinking. >> the quiz? >> want to pay off the quiz. >> what are the three words? >> i remember the three words. >> what are they? >> stuffing, tree and snow. i was also about to cheat and scribble them down. i didn't. i'm very proud of myself. what's your name again? >> dr. mehmet oz. thank you very much. happy holidays. >> happy holidays. >>> just ahead what, justin bieber is saying about the reported split with longtime girlfriend selena gomez and fear the dragon baby. we'll meet the father and son behind the wildly popular online video right after this. into their work, their name on the door, and their heart into their community. small business saturday is a day to show our support. a day to shop at stores owned by our friends and neighbors. and do our part for the businesses that do so much for us. on november 24th, let's get out and shop small. h
the journal on what improvements we see by putting teenagers in this environment. it will be printed next year. what we're seeing is a 10-15% improvement on survival rates. we're not dealing with medicine, just environment. if you had a drug that will give you 10-15% improvement on your outcome, they would throw billions at you. >> you cannot really argue with that. it sounds like a great plan. was there someone specifically? how did you become interested in teenage cancer? how did you notice there was a gap in this? >> as i said earlier, i noticed basically because my doctor and his wife noticed. i just have one of those brains that seem to me straight line, sensible things to do. there is a huge problem in madison of the moment. costs are going through the roof. there are other things you can do to improve the care of the patient. the one role of medicine that is observation of pedicethe patien. basically from the beginning when it was posed to me as a problem. >> when it was announced you were speaking here we did get questions from the general public, and some came from young adult teenage
examines how the u.s. can be economically competitive in a global environment. >> later today british prime minister david cameron delivers his keynote address on policy at the lord mayor's banquet in london. the event is attended by members of the city's financial and diplomatic corps. you can see his remarks live at 3:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. and i'm proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that insures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000, aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly-elected congress starts work in january, but the current congress still has work to do through the end of the
are being formed today in an environment that's much, much more radical than was the case nearly a decade earlier. i think there are some important lessons that the u.s. can learn from iraq and from afghanistan and from what's taking place there. but again the thing i would take away and the thing i would really stress to people is that this is not a war that the u.s. can win on its own. it's very -- it's very tempting for the u.s. to see a problem and to want to go in and solve it all the way. and i think there has to be a realization that sometimes being so pro active and carrying out so -- proactive and carrying out so many missile strikes and drone strikes can actually have a negative impact. >> ibrahim, did you want to chime in on this one? >> well, i didn't hear the question. i have a hard time hearing from the audience. but what greg said made sense to me so thank you. [laughter] >> i'm sorry. i'll start repeating the question to make sure we can get it. >> thank you. >> in the back. >> thank you. good morning. my name is giancarlo gonzalez with talk radio service. yemeni president
document. the job of government is to provide an environment in which our citizens can live their lives knowing that they will not be subject to nefarious actions by others. in the case of the farmers and ranchers, the terrible stories, thousands of stories like this that the chairman described. there was a failure of government to protect these people, and the results of this investigation, fulfilling congress' obligation to oversight, tell us we have many opportunities to improve and provide better protection, and these opportunities run the gamut from following the behavior of those who are in charge at entities like mf global to monitoring and modifying the ways in which the rating agencies do their business, do their job. there have been so many failures in so many ways, not only at an f global, but at other similar stories in recent history. one common strand seems to be that we need to provide our regulators with better tools to pursue the enforcement of law that existed prior to the massive imposition of dot-franc pit which did not have infinite resources and united states, nor
whether we have to compete. you have to benchmark what your tax environment, your regulatory environment, your energy costs. the good news is in terms of getting manufacturing, we're still the world's largest market. when global investors take a look at the u.s., and canada's rate is 15% and hours is 35%, where are you going to site your plant? $1.75 trillion a year, a number that is larger than all but 80 economies in the world. it is not particularly attractive. when this administration refuses to utilize our domestic energy resources, refuses the keystone pipeline which would bring jobs and energy down to america, they reject that. that is not attractive in terms of global investment and job creation. the caller also talked about what caused the deficit then been a lot of charts and graphs dispel some myths. over four years, the total deficit was 5000 $92 billion. the taxes on the wealthy over that same time was $136 billion. all other americans was $544 billion. total cost of the bush tax cuts and the wars was about $1.30 trillion which means 75% of the deficit was caused by other sp
the regulatory environment of a second obama term. in the past 90 days the obama administration has posted 6,125 regulations and notices on its regulations.gov website, an average of 68 a day, jenna. jenna: wow, doug mcelway live from d.c. thank you. rick: frustration turning to violence after weeks without power on long island, new york. an electrical worker is now in the hospital after getting sucker punched by an angry long island resident. john apple white came up from florida to help out with the recovery efforts. he had been working 16-hour days when he was hit. now he's recovering from a broken jaw and cracked cheekbone. >> he gave me no signs of anything aggressive. he was in a nice vehicle, dressed fairly nice from what i could tell. as soon as i got within an arm's reach of him he decked me. i'm not going to let it get me down. i even skroeu what i do enjoy what i do. i'm not going to let one person spoil this. >> others are taking utility companies to court following a class action lawsuit against the long island power authority. do they have a case? lis wiehl is a fox news legal
, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-511-3035 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ zimplt this is the cnn newsroom. we're continuing our special coverage right now. the president's first news conference since being re-elected. i'm wolf blitzer in washington. i'm joibd by our league suzanne malveaux. these shooes at the cnn center in tlapt. our gloria borger, our donna brazil and alex, our national security credibilitior fran townsend, also a member of the
into these environments which are very, very important places to be, and debate our core value, not just explained them, not just lecture, but actually debate our greatest strengths i think will be stronger. so that was one of the ways we really tried to do that. and also to take the benefit of the folks who were there in the field, give information as to who was the important audiences for the bbg. >> can i just clarify one thing? when i said more guidance from foreign policy leadership for the bbg, i certainly didn't mean that the bbg should forsake or distort or anyway jeopardize the journalistic values. very, very important. but for example, the bbg's, the board of governors decide where the assets are allocated. in other words, if the governors decide we're going to put all the money into india, it's their decision rather than the part of the more strategic decision-making process. congress would get involved if all the money went to one country. >> do you think? [laughter] >> there's certain country's bbg would like to get rid of that congress wouldn't allow and that sort of thing. but i'm guessi
environment and economic factors are making things somewhat difficult for our customers and that's why we're getting to those numbers. the stock had come in and it's going to again today. >> a lot of investors are thinking that this gigantic move and pull back appropriately to some average and was ready to blast off. look, you've got target nipping, you've got dollar tree reporting good numbers today. walmart had a great move. and now its great move i think has run its course. >> an amazing chart, if you go back to walmart stocks, the dip in the stock, it was the bryberry bottom for this quarter. i don't know if we're setting up for something better than anticipation but the head of u.s. walmart said november sales started ahead of plans. and they have got some extra sales thanks to lay away which has been a very popular program for retailers of late. >> we used to get monthly comps from all these retailers. >> those were the old days. >> i think the problem with wam mart, frankly is, the stock was acting as if it was going to put target numbers up. pets smart reported the best numbers of
to the attacks? what was our assessment, our united states assessment, of the environment and the conditions on the ground and had we in advance positioned the right resources to mitigate risk and to make sure that we could handle those known possibilities? >> all right. general marks, thank you very much. appreciate it. i want to go back to the attacks on israel and gaza. the u.n. security council now holding an emergency closed door session about the crisis. member nations called for this. maximum restraints so the situation does not deteriorate any further. the big fear is that the escalating violence could echo the 2008 war that led to israel's land invasion of gaza. the year-long war killed some 1,400 palestinians and israeli. fred joining us from jerusalem. fred, first of all, we saw the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu speaking earlier about the escalating violence, the tension here. here's what he said. >> no government would tolerate a situation where nearly one-fifth of its people live under a constant barrage of rockets and missile fire, and israel will not tolerate this
system. so it's awkward to support a group like this. but there is support for it in this environment. the system will dissolve because there's resistance. >> trevor, i often feel when you talk to political operatives on both sides and fundraisers on both sides and donors, there's a strong word, but it's kind of a self hating quality to the people who are participating in the system. they feel trapped. this thing is going to go on and therefore the plaintiff used to it. is that what is sustaining this? >> well, during the course of the campaign i had a chance to talk to a range of major republican donors and even may feel republicans are more interested in the super pacs. the party had embraced them and citizens united. i thought rummy donors say to me, this is terrible. i don't want to rent an unlimited check if this is not our president not to get selected and we need to talk about this after the election. so now i think one of the things that i be doing is certainly untruths are you back around and say are you into changing the system? if you look at it, even the candidates are pri
exactly how to get things done, exactly in a partisan political environment. sound familiar? what lessons want we learn from him? joining us now, author of a new fantastic book called "thomas jefferson, the art of power." john meachem joins us live. >> you talk about how thomas jefferson, as he gets up first thing in the morning, as many people are now, he had a ritual he would plunge his feet into a base son of cold quarter. >> it is. there's a groove on the floor where the bowl was brought in. but he lived to be 84 so it's a pretty good policy. >> maybe i need a bucket. thomas jefferson was a guy who loved politics. he loved to design stuff, he was a big thinker, he kept great details but at the end of the day he was a guy who could bring two sides together. north, south, come on, let's wind up in the middle. >> he had endless appetite for art, for wine, for women, for architectural books and also power. he was born to it in virginia. the eldest son in an important family. i learned from a very early age. he was was a political apprentice. for 40 years he was pretty much in public offic
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> welcome back to "early start." more than two weeks after super storm sandy, thousands of people in new york are still in the dark and cold demanding answers right now. >> much of the anger is directed at the long island power authority or lipa for failing to respond to the big one. lipa is the target of a class-action lawsuit and its chief operating officer is stepping down. deb feriyak has been covering this for us. >> it's ban hot mess is the only way to describe it. you have an organization that basically hires out the power grid to a different contractor and what ended up happening is they basically lost control. they weren't prepared. they knew that the big storm was coming but reports said they didn't make the most basic changes like cutting tree branches so the wires wouldn't have to be taken down. this caused a lot of people to be plunged into darkness during the storm. people on long island are tired of the cold, the dark and the run-around from the power company out her
into the earnings. again, a specialty retailer, sometimes it's really tough and a hard retail environment. but the stock is up 18%. they have had a really good run of it. this one will be a good test of the overall consumer out there. tracy: i'm still thinking about justin bieber singing at a victoria's secret fashion show. he's too young. he needs a haircut. i'm so old, can't i can't even take it. sandra smith, thank you so much. he's like 12. up next, cisco systems moving higher today. reporting their first-quarter results. after the bell, coming up. countdown to the closing bell, liz claman will be speaking with john chambers. countdown to the closing bell is next. do not go anywhere. before copd... i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not ey to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung funcon starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that mea
in this consolidated apple like checkout, iphone, anyone can check you out, it's efficient, nice environment. it's the apple store customer interface combined with the best brands of the world in a small geography. we had $250 a square foot in sales with the traffic down 12%. >> for your sake and for ron johnson's sake i hope this works and i love a great come back story. >> i want to leave our viewers with one thing. the biggest problem people have with something like this, how can i own a stock when the sales are down 26%? i'll make one analogy and help people think about how to value this company. we took a stake in wendy's, why did people not like wendy's? i get a chance we come back after a commercial, i'm happy to stay. >> i think we're going. >> give me one minute and i'm happy to come back another time. wendy's, people hated the management, there was a fast growing company called tim horton's inside wendys. we separated and the stock doubled. we have this fast growing retail inside jcpenney, profitable and high margins and the rest of jcpenney is shrinking. it's hard to look at it on a c
a very weak economy. and we are looking at, as you said, an environment in which people are really in panic mode over the fiscal cliff. and i think there is a lot of support actually because the population doesn't seem to understand what exactly the fiscal cliff is and what it means and what they're hearing on television is an awful lot of hype about what's going to happen come if the fiscal cliff isn't a boy. and i think what that is doing is it's generating quite a bit of support for both sides to come together. it seems like the right thing to do, put your partisan differences aside and do what's best for the country. and figure out someway to avoid the cliff. and what that means in practice is striking some kind of a deal. what we are probably all heard referred to as a grand bargain. and i think what is important to keep in mind is that the grand bargain itself is really a form of austerity. it's an austerity plan. and so when you got an economy that is still struggling to fully find its feet, and you're at the same time talking about imposing austerity, i think we've seen pre
energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> hard rock international is teaming up with yoko ono. and why hunger for the imagine there's no hunger campaign. horn $4.5 would million has been raised during the past five years and the president and ce off of the hard rock cafe has been very involved in this. tell us a little bit it. >> thanks for having me. this is a ram we've beprogram w running for many years. there are a billion people beneath poverty and hunger level in the world. and the program really is a program that enjoins why hunger, yoko ono and ourselves and we encourage our staff and our customers to basically provide funding around this holiday season so that we can divert the -- >> so if i eat at a cafe or one of your
that trade the bank stocks right now say low interest rate environment and no growth or low growth environmentment in 2013. reason they are not particularly optimistic. today these stocks are bouncing back. carl, they have been beaten up badly in the last couple of months. >> thanks, bob. bob pisani. send it back to head quarters and kayla. she has the market flash. >> watching diamond food. the stock tlaubled for the last year a half. down another 11% today on a downgrade from jefferies. jefferies saying there is a -- 33% more downside for this company to go. last week it restated earnings for the last two years. wipe out about $56 million in profit. they had problem was their accounting and with the payme payments. >> meantime, tensions rising in the middle east. senior official close to binyamin netanyahu is ready for ground invasion in the gaza strip but prefers diplomatic solution to that conflict. >> reporter: hello there. in fact, it is nighttime in g . gaza. the attention is shifting south of where we are. focusing more on cairo, egypt. that's where intense negotiations ar
are looking at, as you said, an environment in which people are in panic mode over the fiscal cliff. i think there is a lot of support, actually, because the population does not seem to understand what the fiscal cliff is and what it means. what they are hearing on television is a lot of hype about what will happen if the fiscal cliff is not avoided. that is actually generating quite a bit of support for both sides to come together. it seems adult. it seems like the right thing to do. put your partisan differences aside for the country, and find some way to avoid the cliff. what that means in practice is striking some kind of deal, what we have heard of, as a grand bargain. it is important to keep in mind that the grand bargain itself, is really a form of austerity. this is an austerity plan. when you have an economy that is still struggling to find its feet, and you are talking about imposing austerity, i think we have seen pretty clearly, watching europe over the last 3.5 years -- that is not a good idea. we definitely have time to start -- to stop and get this right, before we follow gree
are working hard every day against a very challenging market and environment. we have a solid reform in the farm bill in terms of setting up a risk insurance plan for the first time in american history. have full support from the dairy industry and dairy providers. lots of compromise and negotiation. again, a $23 billion reduction to the deficit in terms of last -- the last farm bill. that was done on june 19. since then the house leadership has refused to bring a farm bill to the floor despite the fact that the house agriculture committee, which i sit on, actually passed a bipartisan measure, so it was teed up and ready for action here on the house floor. and yet we have gone five months since the senate acted. we have seven weeks of recess prior to this past tuesday. we have american farmers who are sitting out there trying to figure out what on earth is going to be the future in terms of their production and their businesses. and as i said, if you look at the one example of milk, without having a farm bill in place on january 1, we are going to see basically the price of milk spin
it, is the things we are doing to the environment, making these things more unbearable. construction, an earthquake there was one in chile that killed less than a hundred people, fewer than a hundred people. all of these things, and people have been forced to leave the countryside, to come to the city. so we often also discussed these things and how devotion in the land -- how it causes us to have these massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goes through. these things, they are more of the things that we can do something about as a community. but these other theories, they are also talked about. >> host: in reading through your book, "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know", i was struck that so many writers return to haiti. >> guest: i think so many of us come as children. we were a lot like our parents. arkansas like they had no choice to leave. so you do have this yearning for your country. and i have a lot of family that i did quite a lot. but there is this yearning, things that are parents described as a paradise and things to f
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